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OPEN A DISPENSARY IN TEXAS

Dispensary/Cultivation Application Tools and Services:

1. Purchase our Texas Dispensary Application Guide, a detailed summary and checklist of all the action items you will need to complete prior to moving forward with an application submission for a dispensary/cultivation license.

2. Educate yourself on what it really takes to operate a dispensary/cultivation facility. Browse through our collection of Downloadable Marijuana Business Plan Templates (Business Plan, Cultivation Plan, Operations Plan, Security Plan etc.)

3. Let us guide you through the entire application process with our Custom Solutions Package. Contact Us for a complimentary consultation.

In 2015, Texas legalized a limited medical marijuana program, the Texas Compassionate Use Act (S.B 339) which allow patients suffering from epilepsy to access “low-THC cannabis,” marijuana that contains 10% or more cannabidiol (“CBD) and not more than 0.5% tetrahydrocannabinol (“THC”). In 2017, H.B 2107, a bill to legalize a comprehensive medical marijuana program was introduced.

H.B 2107: Pending Program Overview

Update: H.B 2107 failed to pass during Texas’ regular legislative session, however, Texas State Senator Eddie Lucio III refiled H.B 2107 for Texas’ Special Session to be reconsidered for legalization.

In early 2017, a medical marijuana bill was introduced – H.B 2107 authorizes the possession, use, cultivation, distribution, transportation, and delivery of medical cannabis for medical use by patients with certain debilitating medical conditions and the licensing of dispensing organizations and cannabis testing facilities.

Read H.B 2107 here:

http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/tlodocs/85R/billtext/pdf/HB02107I.pdf#navpanes=0

Regulating Department: The Department of Public Safety

Qualifying conditions: Cancer, glaucoma, positive status for human immunodeficiency virus, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, agitation of Alzheimer’s disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, autism, sickle cell anemia, severe fibromyalgia, spinal cord disease, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury or post-concussion syndrome, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Parkinson’s disease, muscular dystrophy, or Huntington ’s disease; chronic medical condition that produces, or the treatment of a chronic medical condition that produces: (i) cachexia or wasting syndrome; (ii) severe pain; (iii) severe nausea; (iv) seizures, including those characteristic of epilepsy; or
(v) severe and persistent muscle spasms, including those characteristic of multiple sclerosis.

Medical Marijuana Business:

  • Dispensing organizations will be allowed to cultivate, process, and dispense medical cannabis to qualifying patients.
  • Cannabis Testing Facilities will be allowed to analyze the safety and potency of medical cannabis.
  • Application Fees shall not exceed $2,500

Program Timeline:

February 2017 – H.B 2107 Introduced

July 2017 – H.B 2107 Re-introduced

TBD – H.B 2107 pass and program legalize

TBD – Rules adopted

TBD – Application for business licenses accepted

By December 2017 – New qualifying patient access to medical cannabis via existing dispensing organizations.

Texas Compassionate Use Act: Current CBD Program Overview

On June 1, 2015, Gov. Greg Abbot signed SB 339– a limited medical marijuana bill- into law. Known as the Texas Compassionate Use Act, it is intended to allow some qualifying patients to access “low-THC cannabis,” marijuana that contains 10% or more cannabidiol (“CBD) and not more than 0.5% tetrahydrocannabinol (“THC”). The Texas Department of Public Safety was tasked to develop the administrative rules for the program which includes the requirements for state regulated businesses known as “dispensing organizations” to cultivate, process, and distribute low-THC cannabis.

Medical Marijuana Businesses:

The bill required the Department to license at least three dispensing organizations by Sept. 1, 2017. The license will authorize the organizations to cultivate, process and dispense low-THC cannabis to prescribed patients. The department accepted applications for dispensing organization licenses from March 1, 2017, through March 31, 2017. The department received 43 applications and has since awarded licenses to the top 3 scoring applicants.

Program details and timeline in relation to licensing applications:

  • SB 339 passed on June 1, 2015
  • The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) will license at least three dispensing organizations
  • DPS submitted the proposed administrative rules
  • Proposed administrative rules for public commenting ended July 23, 2015
  • Proposed administrative rules were approved August 27, 2015
  • DPS submitted approved administrative rules to the Texas Register for publication
  • The Compassionate Use Program Proposed Administrative Rules was published on Sept 18, 2015
  • Public commenting expired Oct 19, 2015
  • DPS will be accepting applications for marijuana business licenses until March 31st, 2017
  • License winners announced in April of 2017

The Texas Dispensary Application Process requires that you have specific essential plans when submitting your application. Learn more about the required and recommended business plans for Texas below.

 

REQUIRED TEXAS BUSINESS PLANS FOR DISPENSARY APPLICATION:

RECOMMENDED TEXAS BUSINESS PLANS FOR MARIJUANA DISPENSARY APPLICATION:

  • Marketing & Advertising Plan – CUSTOM SOLUTIONS AVAILABLE
  • Administration Plan – CUSTOM SOLUTIONS AVAILABLE
  • Product Labeling & Analysis Plan – CUSTOM SOLUTIONS AVAILABLE
  • Edible and Infusion Bakery Plan – CUSTOM SOLUTIONS AVAILABLE
  • Cleaning & Sanitation Plan – CUSTOM SOLUTIONS AVAILABLE
  • Transportation Plan – CUSTOM SOLUTIONS AVAILABLE

Custom solutions for select plans available, email Info@DispensaryPermits.com for more information.

DEMOGRAPHICS – TEXAS

DECRIMINALIZED

CBD specific

DATE PASSED

June 1 2015

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

On June 1, 2015, Gov. Greg Abbot signed SB 339 into law. Known as the Texas Compassionate Use Act, it is intended to allow some qualifying patients to access “low-THC cannabis,” marijuana that contains 10% or more cannabidiol (“CBD) and not more than 0.5% tetrahydrocannabinol (“THC”). The legislation allows up to 3 regulated businesses known as “dispensing organizations” to cultivate, process, and distribute low-THC cannabis.

QUALIFYING MEDICAL CONDITIONS

Intractable epilepsy is the only condition that qualifies. Intractable epilepsy is defined as a seizure disorder in which the patient’s seizures have been treated by two or more appropriately chosen and maximally titrated antiepileptic drugs that have failed to control the seizures.

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES

Potential future opportunities

NUMBER OF DISPENSARIES

3

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